The Bard MAT Program is proud to offer credit bearing graduate courses in the disciplines of Literature, History, and Mathematics to NYC public school teachers for the fall of 2011.

Courses are offered at a reduced rate to teachers who mentor for the Bard MAT Program, and for teachers at schools within our South Bronx Network.

If you would like to learn more about Bard's Graduate Courses for Teachers, click the button next to your discipline to register for updates.

HISTORY 2012 - 2013: SLAVERY & RECONSTRUCTION

This graduate seminar on the History American Slavery and Reconstruction examines the complex social, economic, and political nature of slavery as it developed across both time and place in the British North American colonies and the United States. Students will study: the unique way that black servant/slaves were first imported and then enslaved in the Chesapeake and Carolinas in the 17th and 18th centuries; the regional, social, cultural and familial patterns among blacks in the post-Revolutionary period; relationships between blacks and whites within the 19th century plantation household; slave resistance; and pro-slavery and anti-slavery arguments in the antebellum period. The course ends with an examination of emancipation and the social, economic, and political process of Reconstruction.
To learn more about this course, and to register, click here >

MATH 2012-2013: FUNDAMENTAL THEOREM OF ALGEBRA

Do solutions to general polynomial equations exist, and is there a formula? The resolution of these problems lie at the foundation of modern mathematics, and provides deep insight into the school curriculum. Participants in this credit-bearing graduate course will conduct a careful reading of a proof (based on work of Euler, Lagrange and LaPlace) of the Fundamental Theorem of Algebra, that all nontrivial polynomial equations have solutions in the system of complex numbers. All prerequisite mathematical concepts and skills will be gently introduced and explored in a supportive mathematical community. Primary historical documents play an essential role in this course.
To learn more about this course, and to register, click here >

LITERATURE 2012 - 2013: GLOBAL AMERICA

This credit-bearing, ten-week course, taught by Bard College professor Dr. Raphael Allison, will begin to answer such questions by examining American literature as an international and transnational phenomenon. We read essential texts spanning five centuries (from 1640-2008), examining each in terms of how American identity is forged through cultural contact. Our keywords will include globalism, identity, contact, hybridity, transnationalism, the Other, cosmopolitanism, culture, and imperialism. Our method will be close reading, paying particular attention to how texts negotiate relationships between subjects and subjectivity, and how identity is created as a response to otherness. We will also pay attention to critical writings about American literature that focus on its transnationalism.
To learn more about this course, and to register, click here >

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